Estes Alpha III Rocket Launch Set

June 10, 2019 - Comment

The Estes Alpha III rocket launch set contains a launch controller, launch pad, and rocket kit packet with materials and instructions required to assemble the rocket. It is recommended for children 10 years and older with adult supervision up to age 12. The orange plastic nose cone, body tube, one-piece plastic tail fin unit, and

The Estes Alpha III rocket launch set contains a launch controller, launch pad, and rocket kit packet with materials and instructions required to assemble the rocket. It is recommended for children 10 years and older with adult supervision up to age 12. The orange plastic nose cone, body tube, one-piece plastic tail fin unit, and self-stick decals allow assembly of the rocket without painting. Additional supplies required to launch the rocket include model rocket engine, starter, recovery wadding, and glue (sold separately). This rocket launch set provides the equipment required to launch (with required components) the Alpha III rocket repeatedly and is suitable for youth group activities such as with clubs and schools.

SpecificationsSkill levelEasy to Assemble (E2X), simple gluing, no paintingAge recommendation10 years and up, adult supervision under 12Recommended engines1/2A6-2, A8-3 (First Flight), A8-5, B4-4, B6-4, B6-6, C6-5, C6-7Projected maximum altitude1,100′ (335m)Rocket weight1.2 oz. (34 g)Dimensions*12.3 x 0.98″ (H x W)Required components (not included)Rocket Engine with Starter, such as Estes 001598 A8-3 Engine
Recovery Wadding, such as Estes 002274 Wadding

*H is height, the vertical distance from the lowest to highest point; W is width, the horizontal distance from left to right.

A model rocket kit includes reusable parts, and requires launching equipment and single-use launching supplies. These kits are recommended for children 10 years and older, with adult supervision advised to age 12. Rocket kit assembly encompasses a range of skill levels—from Easy-to-Assemble (E2X), requiring only simple gluing and less than an hour of time—to Level 5, requiring multi-step assembly with measuring, cutting, gluing, and painting tasks. Reusable rocket kit components include a cone, a body tube, and a recovery parachute. A rocket engine, a starter, and recovery wadding are used once. Rocket engines come in a variety of sizes, time delays, and burn durations. A “first-flight” engine recommendation is generally made for each rocket kit. A launch pad has a stable base and a vertical rod that provide vertical stability during initial liftoff. A launch controller has a keyed ignition switch to prevent accidental ignition, and a cable provides a safe distance from the rocket during launch. Bulk packs of model rocket kits are available for clubs and schools, and allow groups of children to experience building and launching a rocket.

Estes manufactures model rocket kits, launching equipment, and rocket engines. The company, founded in 1958, is headquartered in Penrose, CO.

What’s in the Box?

Alpha III assembly kitAstron II launch controllerAstron II launch padSupply/instruction packet

Product Features

  • Launch controller, launch pad, and rocket assembly kit with materials and instructions required to assemble the rocket
  • Orange plastic nose cone, body tube, one-piece plastic tail fin unit, and self-stick decals for level E2X (Easy to Assemble) assembly skill
  • Projected maximum altitude of 1,100′ (335m), 12″ diameter parachute for rocket recovery
  • Recommended for ages 10 and older with adult supervision up to age 12
  • Requires model rocket engine, starters, recovery wadding, and glue (all sold separately)
  • Easy to assemble
  • Almost ready to fly
  • An Estes classic
  • Launch system included (Launchpad colors may vary)
  • Flies over 1100′

Comments

Anonymous says:

Would be 5-star with the pictured launch pad As others have mentioned, they swapped out the launch pad in the picture with a lower end, but acceptable, launch pad. But it really does come with most everything you need as a starter kit except the consumables. Here’s what you’ll need to fly:GlueScissorsPencilA small sharp knife (like an exacto)A 9V batteryA pack of standard Estes motors (I suggest: A8-5, B6-6, C6-7)A pack of igniters (usually comes with the Estes motors)A pack wadding (special tissue-like paper that goes between the motor and the chute)My son and I were able to assemble everything in an hour or two (using gel crazy glue for fast drying). It was really easy if you carefully read the directions.WARNING TO CALIFORNIANS: Please, please, PLEASE be aware of the laws in CA for launching rockets. You need explicit permission of your local fire marshal and the property owner as well as meeting a bunch of other laws. In practice that means…

Anonymous says:

Worth every penny. Fantastic product!! I have a 7 and 5 year old girls who absolutely loved it. Putting it together was relatively simple. I supervised the construction and it took them about two hours to put it together over a couple of days. The 7 year old did the bulk of the work and the only reason we spread the work over a two-day period is because we had to wait for the paint to dry (cheap spray paint for our first project). I did a little research beforehand and purchased the engines and wadding at the same time we purchased the kit, so we had everything available when it was time to launch. For about $50 bucks total we had a great time. The Estes website offers lesson plans free of charge which enabled me to confidently discuss some basic concepts with the girls. They really enjoyed it! Moreover, we set up assigned launch positions, rotated them around, and they loved the entire launch production. We used two different engines and both worked great. Two A8-3 engines to start out, then we…

Anonymous says:

I forgot how much fun model rocketry is My 6 year-old and I had fun putting the rocket together Christmas morning (she dropped the Shopkins for the rocket), and after picking up some motors at the local hobby shop, we went to a local field and let ‘er rip. Four launches and four successful recoveries later, and we’re looking forward to building bigger and more intricate rockets. Can’t wait for spring (or another good freeze).

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